The Network

for LGBT Tobacco Control

Tips for how to get health promotion messages into LGBT blogs

By Scout
Director
Network for LGBT Health Equity
A project of The Fenway Institute, Boston, MA
Reporting from Netroots Nation LGBT Pre-Conference, Minneapolis, MN
 

It's a packed room of bloggers and LGBT orgs at the Netroots LGBT Pre-Conf

We all have to build new skills

Remember just last year when many state dept of health folk were blocked from Facebook, Twitter and other social media? Well, perhaps because the feds have set a standard of using social media for their routine promotion work, we all now realize that Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter… all these are tools we will need to understand and use in order to ace health promotion work in this new era.

Well, despite the fact that you are reading this on a blog, don’t think we’re not as overwhelmed with all these new media as everyone else. We’re trying our hardest to learn how to use these new tools effectively. But boy it’s a lot.

Many of you know, lots of our LGBT print media has already gone out of business, some have switched to an all online format, some have just folded. This struggle is one of the reasons why the print media is really susceptible when folks like RJR Reynolds start pumping SNUS ads. Like happened in Minnesota, it’s often a real challenge to get the magazine or newspaper to refuse these ads in todays world. Face it, this is one of the main reasons why we have to struggle to raise awareness that we have health disparities like our crazy high smoking rate. It’s long past time for us to take some tips from major corporations and start being more savvy about how to get healthy messages integrated into LGBT media. But how do we do it with a fraction of their funding?

So, you know we’re at this Netroots LGBT Pre-Conf today… I’m listening avidly to all the many LGBT bloggers in the room. Let me share a bit of what I’ve learned about smart strategies for getting those healthy messages into LGBT online media.

First, what are the bigger LGBT blogs?

It’s a little hard to figure out exact readership, and some focus more on social versus serious messaging, but at least each of these LGBT blogs should be on our radar screens.

Tips for getting coverage in LGBT blogs

  1. Buy ads in them! Yes, the blogs are absolutely independent, but this is one way to start building a relationship which helps get your news noticed.
  2. Offer to write for a blog. One of the big ones, Bilerico.com is actively seeking new contributors now, go on, sign up, one way to get health covered is to write the posts ourselves.
  3. Repost their stories on Twitter/FB, comment on the stories online, just start engaging with them.
  4. Make a short list of the editors of each of those blogs and send them press releases whenever you think somethink is news. Don’t worry if it’s not national, local is ok too. Pics help too.
  5. Give bloggers scoops or first rights to breaking news, this is one fast way to build a relationship.
  6. Write op-eds about health issues and submit them to blogs (customize them for each submission). See some of the op-eds we put up on the IOM report to see a sample of style.
  7. Did I mention buy ads on them? This seems to be a seriously underutilized strategy. Yet some of the blogs above get 40k views/day… that’s a lot of eyeballs we’d like to have reading our health messages, right?

Many of these strategies will work just as well for your local LGBT media as well. And many of them can be real smart strategies for health departments or hospitals to use as a way to demonstrate that your services are LGBT-friendly.

OK, now off I go to try to put some of these strategies into action!

June 15, 2011 Posted by | Action Alerts, APHA, Blogs en español, Break Free Alliance, CPPW, Creating Change, Creating Change 2010, Creating Change 2011, Minnesota, National Coalition for LGBT Health, NatNet, Presentations, Puerto Rico, Resources, Scholarship Opportunity, social media, Steering Committee, Tobacco Policy, two_spirit_wellness, Uncategorized, USSF, USSF_mlp, webinar | , , , | Leave a comment

Action Alert: Letter to CDC to Include LGBTs in Data Collection!

by Emilia Dunham

Network Program Associate

You may recall our report from Creating Change when we mentioned a letter to CDC we were circulating to urge CDC to include LGBT questions on their surveys. At Creating Change we asked folks to sign on to the letter in person and received over 250 signatures! However, before we send the letter, we’d like to offer the opportunity to anyone who wasn’t in Minneapolis that week.

EDIT: A recent blog entry by Scout shows that the Institute of Medicine’s new report urges the need for LGBT data collection.

Dear CDC:

You just released a report on health disparities – what does it say about LGBT health? No data.

At the same time you released $45M for state data collection. How much went to collecting LGBT data? $0

Please fix this problem. We applaud you for calling for data collection in your disparity report. Now we ask you to follow through and do it. Please make LGBT data collection a routine part of all your health surveys. Our health depends on it.

Sincerely,

You

If you haven’t already done so, please take just a minute to sign on in support of LGBT inclusion. Click here to sign.

Please respond by April 1st, 2011.

***NEW DEADLINE: TUESDAY, MARCH 22ND, 2011*** Signatures will be accepted through April 1st, but may not be time to include in official letter.

Thank you!

The Network

March 9, 2011 Posted by | Action Alerts, Creating Change, Creating Change 2011 | 3 Comments

CC11 Action Alert: Help Increase Services for HIV-positive older adults

Sasha Kaufmann, Blogging Scholar with the Network for LGBT Health Equity

by Sasha Kaufmann

Guest Blogger, reporting on Creating Change, Minneapolis 2011

Did you know that by 2013, half of the people living with HIV in the United States will be over 50? Between social isolation, stigma, and the normal effects of growing older on the body, without the right support aging for LGBT and/or HIV-positive individuals can be a harrowing experience.

I learned today that there is an opportunity to change that! The reauthorization of the older americans act is supposed to occur this year. The law funds community planning and social services for over 30,000 service providers nationally. Programs such as buddy systems, meal programs, and home care are included. Listing HIV-positive and LGBT older adults as vulnerable populations will increase funding and attention to the crucial services needed to give seniors in our communities a better life. There is also an opportunity to modify the definition of family caregiver in this reauthorization as well, allowing for the proper compensation and recognition for taking care of partners and loved ones.

Want to put in your two cents? Then submit a comment to the Administration on Aging and urge them to include LGBT and HIV-positive older adults as vulnerable populations!

Solidarity and Snuggles,

Sasha

February 6, 2011 Posted by | Action Alerts, Creating Change 2011 | 1 Comment

Health Advocacy Webinar Monday: Act Now to Enhance State LGBT Suicide Prevention Plans

By Scout
Network Director

State LGBT Groups and Network for LGBT Health Equity Collaborate on State Health Advocacy Webinar

Monday Jan 31, 4-5 pm EST the Network, CenterLink, and Equality Federation will be jointly throwing a webinar about an immediate opportunity for local LGBT advocates to provide input to statewide suicide prevention programs. Please join us as we get the latest dope from guest speakers Dr. Barbara Warren from Hunter College and Dave Reynolds from The Trevor Project on how to use this opportunity to enhance local work or partner with your state. The webinar is open to all, RSVP online; registration is required to estimate number of lines needed.

Background: The Broken Record “Include LGBTs In All Your Health Funding”

The Network for LGBT Health Equity has been saying one thing over and over to several different federal agencies: do a better job at including LGBT disparities in all your funding streams. But we’re not just complaining, we’ve got some specific ideas on how to improve this. One big strategy is to require disparity plans in all that money you spread around the country. We recently prepared a joint paper on this with the other tobacco disparity networks. We presented this policy paper to CDC (the federal prevention/infectious disease arm) and shared it with SAMHSA (the federal mental health arm); this week we’re going to be presenting it to the head of disparities at NIH (the federal health research arm). We also spoke up at the recent SAMHSA public meeting about requiring LGBT disparity plans in all incoming proposals, we even gave them some other federal health requests for proposals to use as samples. Big thanks to the excellent folk at Administration for Children and Families (uh, the federal kid/family health arm) who are leading the way on this topic by requiring LGBT disparity plans in proposals last year.

News: Unprecedented LGBT Inclusion in Recently Released Call for $18M of State & Campus Suicide Prevention Proposals

Well, a week ago we were thrilled to see that SAMHSA has really stepped up and used these strategies to significantly enhance their recently released requests for $18M of suicide prevention proposals. These enhancements go across two different requests for proposals, one for states, one for campuses. While the last request did include mention of LGB disparities, now the applicants are asked to talk about specific LGBT disparity plans and collaborations in some detail, in two different proposal sections that are worth a total of 55% of the total score. No one is guaranteed money, so that’s why we’re betting any state or campus going after this cash will be very responsive to every detail, including LGBT disparity plans. An estimated 32 awards will be given to states, and 18 to campuses. The awards last for up to 3 years.

Action Alert: States Turning in Proposals on Suicide Prevention February 18th – Now’s The Time to Forge Partnerships!

So as we see it, here’s the math…

States writing suicide prevention proposals now
+ States need more LGBT inclusion than ever before
= Perfect window for local LGBT advocates to contact them and suggest smart LGBT suicide prevention strategies & partnerships!

If you want to learn how to contact the state reps crafting these proposals or find some smart strategies to suggest to them, then please join us on this webinar!

WHEN: Monday January 31, 2011, 4 pm EST

WHERE: Please RSVP online to register and we’ll send you call information the morning of the call

WHO: Anyone interested in advocating for better LGBT suicide prevention work in their state

AGENDA

  • Overview of this Advocacy Opportunity & Goals – Dr. Scout, Network for LGBT Health Equity
  • Finding the Right State Rep – Dr. Scout
  • LGBT Youth Suicide Prevention Strategies – Dr. Barbara Warren, Hunter College Ctr or LGBT Soc. Sci. & Public Policy & Dave Reynolds, Trevor Project
  • Partnering with your state – Dr. Barbara Warren & Dave Reynolds
  • Comments from CenterLink & Equality Federation staff
Questions? Ask them here or email lgbthealthequity@gmail.com.


January 25, 2011 Posted by | Action Alerts | 1 Comment

Action Alert: Tell Gov’t to Incl Trans Folk & Collect LGBT Data in Nu Health Plan!

By Scout
Director, Network for LGBT Health Equity

Spoiler: Only have 2 min to act? Skip down to the Red Headline for 2 Min version.

Deadline Today!! Draft Health Prevention Strategy Released, Comments Until Jan 13th.

As many of you know, health care reform included a mandate for heads of many federal agencies to get together in a historic collaboration to plan for better health prevention in our country. This is one of the many examples of a fundamental shift from health care into health prevention activities. Since we know tobacco, exercise, and nutrition problems cost us the most healthcare dollars (and more importantly, lives!) down the road, they are big foci of this new cross-government shift. So, this new National Prevention Council was seated, came up with a rough draft prevention plan that folks commented on, then had a stakeholders listening session last week. Well, I’m a bit behind so I didn’t even write up my impressions from that listening session yet (tho we did livetweet all about it) and bam, the group releases their next draft health prevention plan for comment. We’ve got until Jan 13th to give feedback, so please folk, take a minute and chime in. The document is short, really easy to read and simple to comment on.

See it all here: http://www.hhs.gov/news/reports/nphps.html

Summary of Plan and LGBT Inclusion

There are 4 crosscutting strategic directions.

  1. (SD1) Healthy Physical, Social and Economic Environments
  2. (SD2) Eliminate Health Disparities: This includes LGB, but does not mention T!!! We need to get them to fix this! “Eliminate health disparities experienced by populations (e.g., based on race/ethnicity, gender, disability status, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, geography) in order to achieve health equity.”
  3. (SD3) Prevention and Public Health Capacity
  4. (SD4) Quality Clinical Preventive Services

Then six more after that.

  1. (SD5) Tobacco-Free Living: Excellent that this is first out of the gate, eh?
  2. (SD6) Reduce Alcohol and Drug Abuse
  3. (SD7) Healthy Eating
  4. (SD8) Active Living:
  5. (SD9) Injury-Free Living
  6. (SD10) Mental and Emotional Wellbeing: Including a mention of LGBT in a recommendation under this category. “(R) Promote resiliency, positive family and other social support systems, and community engagement throughout the lifespan and for at-risk populations (e.g., healthy development of LGBT youth, independent living for older adults).”

2 Min Action: Tell Feds Include Trans Folk & Collect LGBT Data!

Get ready.

When you click on link at end it’ll send you to input form, which then creates an email to send in. Copy the text below to paste into that form or feel free to say things in your own words.

They ask: “1. What are your suggestions on the Draft Vision, Goals, Strategic Directions, or Recommendations?”

You say: Include Gender Identity under SD2!

They ask: “4. What measures should be used to monitor progress on implementation of the National Prevention Strategy’s Vision, Goals, and Recommendations?”

You say: Collect LGBT data on all federal and state population surveys! Choosing to not collect data on our disparities helps perpetuate them.

Then press submit and it’ll make an email out of your comments, send it and you’re done!

Before you shoot off to the other screen, please help us get more comments in by using the “Share This” button below.

All set? Now go! Comment here

Thanks!


December 22, 2010 Posted by | Action Alerts | 3 Comments

ACTION ALERT: FEDERAL CULTURAL COMPETENCY STANDARDS BEING ENHANCED: OPEN TILL 12/31/10!

Gustavo Torrez, Program Manager

By: Gustavo Torrez

ACTION ALERT: FEDERAL CULTURAL COMPETENCY STANDARDS BEING ENHANCED: Public Comment Ends December 31, 2010 ACT NOW

As you may have seen we have been reporting for some time now the feds have a set of guidelines for healthcare organizations called the CLAS standards (Cultural & Linguistically Appropriate Services). Some of them are required of all federal funds recipients, others are strongly suggested. Currently, they are taking feedback on how to make these standards better, both online and through a series of live meetings. Although the last live meeting took place on November 15th, it’s not too late to make your voice heard. They are still taking comments till December 31, 2010. While you may think your voice is small, it’s not. The more public comment the better, we have to make sure our voices are heard!

Click here to register and make your comments now, it only take a few minutes! And, if you are not sure what to say, here are some suggestions for you to add:

*Make all standards mandatory for federally funded healthcare agencies, not just the ones related to language.

*Standard 1 – add language in brackets Health care organizations should ensure that patients/consumers receive from all staff member’s effective, understandable, and respectful care that is provided in a manner compatible with their cultural health beliefs and practices, [preferred gender identity,] and preferred language.

*Standard 10 – add language in brackets Health care organizations should ensure that data on the individual patient’s/consumer’s race, ethnicity, [sexual orientation, gender identity,] and spoken and written language are collected in health records, integrated into the organization’s management information systems, and periodically updated.

For those of you who have already filled out the survey, we thank you for all of your continued support for equality for our communities. We all look forward to an enhances set of CLAS Standard in 2011!

December 22, 2010 Posted by | Action Alerts | Leave a comment

Action Alert: The Affordable Care Act (Part II): Section 4302 and Implications for Data Collection

The Affordable Care Act (Part II): Section 4302 and Implications for Data Collection

Thursday, November 18, 2010

1:00 – 2:30pm (Eastern)

This webinar provides an in-depth look at Section 4302 of the Affordable Care Act and its implications for disparities research. Dr. David Meyers, Director of the Center for Primary Care, Prevention, and Clinical Partnerships at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, will point to specific language that impacts data collection on race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation and gender identity. Commentary will be provided by Dr. José J. Escarce, professor of medicine at UCLA and a researcher with the RAND corporation. Register here.

November 17, 2010 Posted by | Action Alerts | Leave a comment

Action Alert: Joint Commission needs stories of bad LGBTQ healthcare!

By Scout
Reporting from 2010 National Coalition for LGBT Health Meeting

Anyone know The Joint Commission? Well, other than being in an acronym twelve-step program (their last name was JCAHO), they are the folk who accredit 95% of all hospital beds in the country. Accredit as in… if the hospital doesn’t pass their tests, I’m pretty sure it’s turned into a walmart. They also accredit community health centers too. All I know is if you work in a hospital or health center and The Joint Commission review is up, you iron your underwear.

Brette Tschurtz from The Joint Commission & Hector Vargas from GLMA

So, did you know The Joint Commission has a big project to improve care for LGBTQ people? Today at the National Coalition for LGBT Health meeting Brette Tschurtz from The Joint Commission came to tell us all about it. They started the project by adding some LGBT leaders to an advisory group, then they followed it up with a recent LGBTQ advisory meeting where they heard earfuls about how care can get better for all of us.

But now they’re going further, developing a toolkit for hospitals and health centers to serve us all better. And in order to know what exactly needs fixing, they need stories of what’s going wrong! Now if you remember that national transgender needs assessment that was just released, 1 in 5 trans people in this country has been denied health care. (Remember Southern Comfort? That trans guy was turned down from care by 19 docs before he died out of treatment.) If you’re that 1 in 5, tell them about it. Or what about everyone, every lesbian who’s been subjected to an endless grilling on birth control, every gay man who had to deal with some suddenly frosty doctor? Or what about the youth, I don’t know about you, but as an openly gay youth in the mental health care system… well let’s just say, it wasn’t pretty at all. (but yes, yes, it got better) (much better actually). So, whatever your flavor — speak up and speak out! The group that can spank your hospital wants to know if those hospitals treat us like second class citizens. Share the news, share the stories and let’s tell them every time the health care system let’s us down!

Email stories to lgbt@jointcommission.org! (No, no hyperlink, apparently that’s just like candy for spammers, so please use the old scissors and white glue to cut and paste in yr email program.)

October 25, 2010 Posted by | Action Alerts | 1 Comment

ACTION ALERT: Federal cultural competency standards being enhanced: open comment period now!

**This will take only about 2-5 minutes of your time!**

The federal government has a set of guidelines for healthcare organizations called the CLAS standards (Cultural & Linguistically Appropriate Services). Some of them are required of all federal funds recipients, others are strongly suggested.

Luckily, right now they are taking feedback on how to make these standards better, both online and through a series of live meetings. Now, you may think your voice is small but I’m here to say, each public comment counts! And better yet, lots of public comments on a subject count quite a lot. So, please please, take a few minutes to look at the standards and chime in to say what you think could be better.

CLAS Standards

Page where you can submit feedback or sign up for a local meeting is here.

Possible ideas for enhancements you could put out there:

  • Make all standards mandatory for federally funded healthcare agencies, not just the ones related to language.
  • Standard 1add language in brackets Health care organizations should ensure that patients/consumers receive from all staff member’s effective, understandable, and respectful care that is provided in a manner compatible with their cultural health beliefs and practices, [preferred gender identity,] and preferred language.
  • Standard 10add language in brackets Health care organizations should ensure that data on the individual patient’s/consumer’s race, ethnicity, [sexual orientation, gender identity,] and spoken and written language are collected in health records, integrated into the organization’s management information systems, and periodically updated.

(Re-posted from website news article on October 5th.)

October 25, 2010 Posted by | Action Alerts | Leave a comment

Tell the Department of Justice to Address Violence Against Trans Women in Puerto Rico

The Trans-Latin@ Coalition has come up with a letter to send to the Department of Justice to address the violence against transgender women in Puerto Rico. The letter is a response to the ongoing deaths and human rights violations of trans women in Puerto Rico, and we need to urge the U.S. to uphold civil rights. Several organizations have signed on in support of this letter.  Please ask your agencies to sign on to this letter so that we can eliminate these atrocities, do not miss the opportunity of your agency being included.  Email your information and organizations information by Tuesday, August 3rd to: Babmy Salcedo bsalcedo@chla.usc.edu, CC lgbttobacco@gmail.org let us know if your able to support.
We ask that you forward this widely to your contacts, lets get as many organizations signed on to this letter as possible…

July 29, 2010 Posted by | Action Alerts | Leave a comment

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