The Network

for LGBT Tobacco Control

Tobacco Industry’s Newest Target: Hipsters

In a recent Media Network Web-cast with the Office of Smoking Health, Stacey Anderson and her colleagues presented on their research: Acceptable Rebellion’: Marketing Hipster Aesthetics to Sell Camel Cigarettes in the U.S.

As an urban resident myself, hipsters are a trademark of my area. Ever impressed with their sense of style, I’ll see hipsters hanging out on their stoops or in front of dive bars/cultural venues with their bicycles, tight pants, plaid and retro/alternative clothing. However, just as ubiquitous as the edgy haircuts and tattoe are the cigarettes in their hands. Which is not far from the truth as 56% of hipsters smoke.

So why are these numbers so high? According to the presentation/article, hipsters seek outlets for freedom and self-expression. They admire the kitsch, absurd, eccentric, and Camel has positioned itself to deliver what hipsters are attracted to.

Why has Camel targeted hipsters? For one, since mainstream advertising options have been restricted, tobacco industries have become acquainted with targeting underground, “alternative lifestyles” (ex. the LGBT community).

What makes hipsters easier targets is their often nihilistic outlook on life that influences them to disregard traditional health warnings against smoking.

The tobacco industry is also aware that “underground” culture influences the market, and while hipsters typically intend to be anti-establishment, they often set mainstream trends.

To overcome the fact that hipsters reject mainstream messages, tobacco marketers admittedly aim to get hipsters to think that they started the trend of smoking.

Just as the tobacco industry has targeted sub-cultural groups by essentially manipulating and inverting their own values against themselves, we need to be less straightforward with our intervention strategy. For instance, perhaps we should expose the manipulation of the tobacco industry’s attempt to infuse a corporate, mainstream product into their culture. Another idea that the presenter brought up would be to use advertising campaigns that hipsters may find attractive, like internet based relatable UrbanFuel.org and XpoZLV.com. The latter of which also hosts smokefree alternative concerts.

For more information on this, an abstract and summary of the article is available at the following link. ‘Acceptable Rebellion’: Marketing Hipster Aesthetics to Sell Camel Cigarettes in the U.S.,  (Tobacco Control, June 2010), Yogi Hendlin, Ph.D. candidate, UC Los Angeles and Stacey Anderson, Ph.D., UC San Francisco.

Blog post by Emilia Dunham

Network Program Associate

 

 

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August 27, 2010 Posted by | social media, Uncategorized | , , , , , | 2 Comments

Youth BrownBag Webinar: Back to School Edition

Youth BrownBag Networking Webinar: Back to School Edition

Wednesday, September 1, 2010

3PM EST

Please join us and the National Youth Advocacy Coalition for a conversation with service providers for LGBTQ youth. What are your strengths and your challenges? What kind of support do you need in this work? Want to strategize on how to build the strengths of your LGBTQ youth programming? For answers and to share opinions on these questions and much more, spend an hour with NYAC and your colleagues for a lively discussion!

This discussion will be moderated by jb beeson and shay(den) gonzalez from NYAC. jb beeson currently serves as the Deputy Executive Director at NYAC and comes from fierce, progressive organizing and community building with queer youth of color communities in California. shay gonzalez comes to NYAC from the Streetwork Project, a drop-in center for homeless and transient youth in Manhattan where he actively developed groups and workshops with, and for, young people around gender, race, class and how they relate to sex and sexuality.

If you would like to register for this call click here. Call in information will be sent directly to registrants.

About the BrownBag Series: Linking people and information: The BrownBag Networking call series is designed to be an open space for, you guessed it, the Network. So pull up a chair and enjoy a virtual lunch with as to network, share, and collaborate with collogues from around the country.

August 25, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized, webinar | , , | Leave a comment

Deconstructing a Disparity: Association of Violence and Discrimination with Smoking Among Sexual Minority Youth Adults

This afternoon, I attended some intriguing presentations from the Population Center’s Summer Institute graduates. Among them, John Blosnich, PhD candidate of Public Health Sciences at West Virginia University stuck out as a researcher looking into violence and discrimination within the context of LGB youth smoking rates. In his presentation, titled:  “Deconstructing a Disparity: Association of Violence and Discrimination with Smoking Among Sexual Minority Youth Adults,” John discusses the hypothesis that minority stress (including homophobia, alcohol abuse, depression, disclosure and bullying) may impact smoking rates among LGB youth–specifically, with regarding minority stress, how sexual minorities use tobacco as a strategy to deal with stress.

Using the National College Health Assessment Survey Fall 2008/Spring 2009 data, John identified the variables victimization, discrimination and tobacco use in comparing gay, lesbians and bisexuals with heterosexuals. As expected, GLB youth experienced not only higher rates of smoking but also higher rates of sexual assault, discrimination, physical assault and threats. However, despite higher rates of all of these factors, higher rates of discrimination and assault did not translate into higher smoking rates. In other words, discrimination and other minority related negative experiences did not affect smoking rates in this sample.

As a result of these findings, John plans to look at resiliency as a factor in why LGBT people who experience discrimination don’t smoke. In addition, he plans to look more closely at gender and race within this context. We are very excited to follow the progress of John’s research project to see what his research yields. Stay tuned for some information, and for more information or to discuss the project, please email him.

by Emilia Dunham

Program Associate with the Network for LGBT Tobacco Control

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August 20, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Best Practices for Internet Outreach

On July 28, the National Youth Advocacy Coalition held a Webinar called ‘Best Practices for Internet Outreach.’

The webinar was presented by guest Ra’Shawn Flournoy, Internet Outreach Coordinator of AID Upstate-Greenville South Carolina

The Objective of the call was to understand how to engage youth in internet outreach and understanding the best practices for conducting outreach and what tools exist.

Flournoy provided some examples of how his organization reaches out to black MSM, and offers suggestions of how organizations can apply these tools and practices for their networking.

Sites commonly used by the LGBT community such as: twitter, facebook, adam4adam, manhunt, myspace, google and craigslist are great ways to reach out for the following ways:

They are AFFORDABLE – Though some sites charge fees, others are completely free to use

They are EFFECTIVE – Within the past 3 years, his organization reached hundreds of black MSM through internet outreach. Of these, over sixty have come in for counseling and testing.

They allow for CAPACITY building – Internet Outreach includes people across the country through webinars, social media, etc.

In performing Internet Outreach, BE AWARE

  • Ensure you are qualified to serve community in the way that you are attempting to do
  • Maintain focus with clients
  • Be self-aware: Are you comfortable with social media or the population you are serving?
  • Need to understand cultural competency to reach them

Great Tips

  • Be honest about purpose about presence on site
  • Make it personalized (use name and picture)
  • Give incentives (prizes for participation)
  • To reaching out to more marginalized individuals, bring in members of those community to do outreach

If you missed the presentation, go to NYAC’s website for slides and recording of the webinar. If you attended the webinar, their website also contains additional resources on reaching out to the LGBT community through social media.

by Emilia Dunham

Network for LGBT Tobacco Control Staff

July 30, 2010 Posted by | social media, Uncategorized, webinar | , , , , | Leave a comment

SRNT Update 5: The New Wave of Cessation

Scary time today.  Early this morning I received a text from back home in Hawaii about all this crazy tsunami stuff after the terrible earthquake in Chile.  Worried all morning about my family back home, it was hard to really have my head in the game.  I still managed to take in some posters and presentations, but hadn’t been able to write up anything until now because I had been glued to the TV.  Things have now been pretty much cleared, so it’s back to tobacco and nicotine!

Speaking of waves, as far as tobacco research, one of those new waves is cessation for adolescents.  That was certainly represented in the presentations here at the SRNT conference.  Let me ruin the ending for you: cessation for youth can and does work.  At least that’s according to the presentations I attended.  There are some barriers and lessons learned that the presenters did an awesome job in talking about. Here’s a quick rundown of what I got:

You might not want to call your youth cessation program a cessation program: Susan Druker from the University of Massachusetts in her presentation talked about how they called their youth cessation research project “Air It Out”.  This as a way to counter the stigma associated with youth cessation and instead capitalized on the idea that teens want to talk and air our their feelings on “stuff.”

Don’t make your cessation program just for smokers: Dr. Jeffrey Fellows from Kaiser Permanente and Dr. Arthur Peterson from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research designed interventions that provided services for both smokers and non-smokers.  This also helped to reduce the stigma of a teen going into a cessation program.  This also helped in recruitment and retention into the program.  Non-smokers would get some preventive information about tobacco or about other health topics.

Be Proactive: speakers pointed out that proactive recruitment and services were key to the efficacy of their interventions.  All programs not only saw significant increases in cessation rates between control and experimental group, but also saw huge retention rates.  While some recruited through well visits to pediatricians, others recruited through schools.

Build rapport: As with most programs that utilize motivational interviewing for cessation programs, rapport is very important to teen cessation.  It starts all the way at the beginning by emphasizing confidentiality, as Air It Out did, and by utilizing trained counselors in motivational interviewing.  Air It Out sent out individualized notes to each teen, which Druker believes was key to their high retention rates.

Kaiser partnered with Free & Clear to provide telephone counseling.  The Fred Hutchinson treatment center also provided phone services while Air It Out provided face to face. The topics covered in the counseling were similar to the topics that are covered in adult cessation, and the cessation rates were similar to those of adults.  One difference is that the youth were not provided with NRT, as it’s still not approved by the FDA.

I will have one more blog entry talking about the awesome posters at the conference.  Too many to share, but I will try to give a taste.

February 27, 2010 Posted by | Scholarship Opportunity | , , | Leave a comment

   

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